Wisdom in Living

Thursday, February 1, 2018

A Healthy Immune System (2)

The Cellular Health

Cells make up your organs. When cells die, your organs fail and health deteriorates, and you age and die.

To maintain and sustain life, some of your cells replicate themselves continually, such as epithelial cells in your intestine, while others do not divide, such as your heart cells and neurons in your brain.

How Body Cells May Become Damaged

Your body is composed of negatively and positively charged molecules, which must be balanced in order to enable your cells to function normally. A free radical is formed when there is imbalance in these molecules. A free radical also damages other molecules, causing them to produce more free radicals—and thus creating a chain reaction of damages that become the scourges of aging and the sources of disease and disorders, in particular, autoimmune diseases.

The Damages by Free Radicals

There are several types of free radicals, and oxygen free radicals are most damaging, especially to your DNA and cell membranes.

Your cells require oxygen for survival. Unfortunately, what gives life also takes away life. In the process of oxidation, harmful oxygen free radicals are produced. Oxygen free radicals and other free radicals in your body cause damages to your cells.

Brain damage

The neurons in your brain may become damaged by free radicals. The damage may be irreparable because the neurons, unlike other cells, cannot replicate themselves.

Cellular damage

The cumulative damage to your DNA by free radicals is a major contributing factor to many autoimmune diseases, including human cancers.

Heart damage

When your LDL or “bad cholesterol” is attacked by free radicals, they become more attached to the walls of your arteries, and thus forming plagues to block the free flow of blood to your heart.

The only way to fight free radicals is by boosting your body’s own immunity.


Boosting Immunity

As you age, your immune system becomes weaker, as evidenced by the high incidence of influenza and pneumonia after age 25, not to mention among the elderly. Therefore, it is important to boost your immunity, which is closely related to your thymus (the commander-in-chief of fighters in your immune system against foreign invaders), with the 10 most important nutritional supplements:

Vitamin A to prevent thymus shrinkage (5,000 IU daily dosage)

Vitamin B6 to maintain hormone levels and to prevent thymus shrinkage (50 mg daily dosage)

Vitamin C to regulate T-cell (white blood thymus cells) function (at least 1,000 mg daily dosage or up to bowel tolerance)

Vitamin E to increase infection resistance (400 0800 IU daily dosage)

Selenium to increase T-cell activity and antibody production for detoxification (100 mcg daily dosage)

Zinc to boost your thymus for maturing T-cells to fight invaders (15 mg daily dosage)

Coenzyme CO10 to increase energy production for cells’ activities

L-glutathione to regenerate immune cells in the immune system (200 mg daily dosage)

Magnesium to increase enzymatic reactions (100 mg daily dosage)

DHEA to control cortisol, the stress hormone (5 mg daily dosage)

Protecting the Immune System

In addition to taking supplements to boost your immunity, you need to use diet, such as a natural thyroid diet, to protect your immune system.

Eat fresh, organic fruits, vegetables, seeds and nuts daily.

Eat natural foods. Cooking, food processing, and freezing destroy some of the health-promoting nutrients, such as enzymes, in your foods. Therefore, it is important to eat raw occasionally.


Eat phytonutrients, which are plant nutrients. These powerful nutrients include carotenoids, flavonoids, and phytosterols, among others.



Stephen Lau
Copyright© by Stephen Lau

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