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Monday, January 7, 2019

The Importance of Cellular Health

The Importance of Cellular Health

Cells make up your organs. When your cells die, your organs fail and health deteriorates; as a result, you age and die.

To maintain and sustain life, some of your cells replicate themselves continually, such as epithelial cells in your intestine, while others do not divide, such as your heart cells and neurons in your brain.

The good news is that, on average, most normal human cells have more than 100 years of lifespan built into them.
The bad news is that all human cells require energy and oxygen to function normally, and in this oxidative process free radicals are created. For example, when you breathe in life-giving oxygen, you also breathe out harmful carbon dioxide. This oxidative process is how your Creator has ingeniously built normal cell death into your body system to ensure your mortality. Slowly and accumulatively, these free radicals build up in your cells, leading to premature cell death. You cannot prolong your life indefinitely, but you can extend your lifespan by slowing down the oxidative process of free radicals. In other words, eradication of free radicals holds the key to optimum health and longevity.

Premature cell death is due to both human and environmental factors, such as bacteria and viruses, free radicals, toxins, and trauma, which can cause irreparable damage to your cells, and thus instrumental in accelerating the demise of these cells. However, many of these factors are not only avoidable but also preventable.

Essentially, genes play an important role in determining the quality of your cells. In other words, your genetic time clock governs how long your cells will live and survive. Your main objective is to outpace your genetic time clock. Remember, nothing is set in stone; you always have a choice—the choice is all yours.

The Damage of Body Cells

Your body is composed of negatively and positively charged molecules, which must be balanced in order to enable your cells to function normally. A free radical is formed when there is imbalance in these molecules. A free radical also damages other molecules, causing them to produce more free radicals—and thus creating a chain reaction of damages that become the scourges of aging and the sources of disease and disorders, in particular, autoimmune diseases.

The damages by free radicals

There are several types of free radicals, and oxygen free radicals are most damaging, especially to your DNA and cell membranes.

Your cells require oxygen for survival. Unfortunately, what gives life also takes away life. In the process of oxidation, harmful oxygen free radicals are produced. Oxygen free radicals and other free radicals in your body cause damages to your cells.

Brain damage

The neurons in your brain may also become damaged by free radicals. The damage may be irreparable because the neurons, unlike other cells, cannot replicate themselves.

Cellular damage

The cumulative damage to your DNA by free radicals is a major contributing factor to many autoimmune diseases, including human cancers.

Heart damage

When your LDL or “bad cholesterol” is attacked by free radicals, they become more attached to the walls of your arteries, and thus forming plagues to block the free flow of blood to your heart.

The only way to fight against free radicals is by boosting your body’s own immunity.


As you age, your immune system becomes weaker, as evidenced by the high incidence of influenza and pneumonia after age 25, not to mention among the elderly. Therefore, it is very important to boost your immunity, which is closely related to your thymus (the commander-in-chief of fighters in your immune system against foreign invaders), with the 10 most important nutritional supplements:

Vitamin A to prevent thymus shrinkage (5,000 IU daily dosage)

Vitamin B6 to maintain hormone levels and to prevent thymus shrinkage (50 mg daily dosage)

Vitamin C to regulate T-cell (white blood thymus cells) function (at least 1,000 mg daily dosage or up to bowel tolerance)

Vitamin E to increase infection resistance (400 - 800 IU daily dosage)

Selenium to increase T-cell activity and antibody production for detoxification (100 mcg daily dosage)

Zinc to boost your thymus for maturing T-cells to fight invaders (15 mg daily dosage)

Coenzyme CO10 to increase energy production for cells’ activities

L-glutathione to regenerate immune cells in the immune system (200 mg daily dosage)

Magnesium to increase enzymatic reactions (100 mg daily dosage)

DHEA to control cortisol, the stress hormone (5 mg daily dosage)

Stephen Lau
Copyright© by Stephen Lau

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